1/ You are concerned with emerging artists. How do you imagine your curatorial role with them?


I often work with artists in the early stages of their careers, who sometimes need reassurance in their practice. But more than that, my job is to help them find their place in the vast world of ’’contemporary art.’’ Not all will be stars whose works will fetch unreal prices on the walls of art fairs... But that won't stop most of them from contributing to the world, even if they don't appeal to the tastes of mainstream collectors. This is where my work comes in: in everyday life, institutions, and the public arena, I use their practices to explore the place we can give to art in all areas of our society.

Eva Medin, Le Jour après la pluie (jour 6)2023Aqua ink, pencil, featherboard, felt, resin, latex, foundry wax, cinefoil.
© Courtesy Dilecta / photo : Nicolas Brasseur. Edgar Sarin, Treize calices de savon de Marseille2018Made by a single gesture in a block of Marseille soap.
© Courtesy Dilecta / photo : Luc Paris

2/ You have recently been appointed artistic director of Un été au Havre. What have you scheduled for the summer of 2024 to make the event more attractive at the same time as the Paris Olympic Games?

The 2024 season is part of a cycle of four events under my direction from 2023 to 2026. I'm trying to tell a story with twists and turns, with connections from one year to the next, with artists featured in several ''episodes.'' I've put aside the idea of doing themed seasons because I admit that ''big themes'' bore me: I would prefer to seize opportunities to showcase a particular artist, according to my intuitions, meetings, and the dynamic of the contemporary art world. Un été au Havre opens in June and closes in September, which leaves plenty of time for visitors of the JO to enjoy an escapade in this city! I can't reveal anything about the coming season just yet. However, we will go ahead with projects that change the perception of Le Havre and can influence its future development. I'm going to continue to make room for a wide variety of media: video, the digital arts, and specifically artificial intelligence, sculpture in its ''classical'' dimension, language literally, and why not works that will live and breathe in the truest sense of the word?

Mon amour, Eric Pougeau © Courtesy Dilecta / photo : Nicolas Brasseur
The melody of Speech, Benjamin Loyauté © Courtesy Dilecta / photo : Nicolas Brasseur

3/ In your opinion, why give art as a gift?

For most art lovers, such as myself, it's a magical object. The important thing is not the inherent value of a work of art or a multiple but the powers we confer to it. There is no better way to say something to someone you love... It is like opening a window onto a new landscape or living matter. It's a way of pronouncing a word, leaving it to the other person to finish the sentence. 

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